THE OUTERCLINCH: WEAPON DISARMS AND WALLFIGHTING
THE OUTERCLINCH: WEAPON DISARMS AND WALLFIGHTING

Wide Range, Narrow Focus

 

Wide Range, Narrow Focus

INSERT Picture of an onion hemisphere.

I'm especially proud of this Outerclinch concept:  Wide Range, Narrow Focus.  

In my 30+ years of martial arts I've literally trained thousands of moves (techniques) from at least 20 martial arts styles.  Wrestling alone has over 3,000 moves.  Brazilian jiu-jitsu is always rapidly expanding, with new variations of guard and half guard and new ways to pass those guards.  How do you get good at so many techniques?

You can't.  A famous wrestling coach said that the average athlete can get good with about 5 moves and an extraordinary athlete can get good at about 10.  That's it.  So why so many moves?

Combat is chaos.  As Bruce once wrote in The Tao of Jeet Kune Do, "Your opponent is not a robot."  Because your opponent is alive and able to think, he is unpredictable and will adapt to what you do.  Therefore, you must adapt to his adaptations in the blink of an eye if you want to be able to defeat someone stronger than yourself.  

"What if he does this?  What if he does that?"  All these answers to the "what ifs" become your system.  

The problem is that you can't get good at responding to thousands of what ifs.  If you divide your training time equally between thousands of moves you will become a "dabbler", familiar with everything but a master of nothing.  So what's the solution?

You have to prioritize.  No matter how many moves you train and how many what ifs you prepare for, your focus has to remain narrow.  Your focus are the moves you practice every training session from day 1.  Your focus moves are moves you can transition in and out, seemlessly, in a variety of situations, 

For Outerclinch, our focus begins with Cop's Russian, a 2-on-1.  As a police officer, I've used it over 20 times in dealing with actual violent people.  If a Badguy is caught inside of my Cop's Russian he will be out of his element.  He cannot possibly have more experience than me with Cop's Russian because I am the inventor of Cop's Russian.  

During a training session, 9 times out of 10, my students and I finish every scenario with Cop's Russian.  That means in a 1-hour session every student is guaranteed a minimum 100 repetitions of Cop's Russian.  If we train 5 hours per week that means 2,000 repetitions of Cop's Russian per month.

Just because the finish is usually the same doesn't mean that the training is the same.  We enter into Cop's Russian from a variety of scenarios: a puncher, a wrestler, a baseball bat, a knife, a pistol, a rifle, multiple opponents, etc.  We defend against strikes and thrusts from all angels: high and low, horizontal and vertical and diagonal, up and down, forehand and backhand.  We even borrow from other styles of fighting to create new entries for Cop's Russian:  kali gunting, wing chun trapping hands, boxing jabs and covers, arm drags and clinches from wrestling, blocking from karate and tae kwon do, silat, muay thai, etc.  Regardless of the situation, 9 times out of 10 we enter into Cop's Russian and finish with a simulated armbreak against the wall.

That's why my female students can reliably tap out my male students with a standing armlock within the first few training sessions!

 

PIC ONION NARROW FOCUS, WIDE RANGE

 

Picture an onion sliced in half.  It is circles within circles.  The outer layers are big and the inner layers are small. No matter how many layers the onion has, there is only one core at its center.  The Cop's Russian is the core of Outerclinch.  PIC ONION

As we expand from the center, the next layer includes three more techniques: Calm Down Sir (my most combat-tested Cop's Russian entry), R2D2 and Pummeling (a wrestling drill for fighting in the clinch).  That is the first circle of Outer Clinch. PIC ONION

The next layer includes any 2-on-1 I would usually use from the Outside Gate:  Bent Russian, Cop’s Armpit, Jacket Pin, Leopardfist, Baseball Grip and Gooseneck.  Those 6 plus Cop’s Russian and R2D2 are 8 out of the Top 10 2-on-1’s for Outerclinch.  Wallfighting is the art of flowing between those techniques at the wall and incorporating strikes and other moves to finish at the wall.  That is the second circle of Outerclinch.  PIC ONION

The next layer includes: the remaining 2 of my Top 10 2-on-1's, Russian Tie and I2D2, which are used for fighting from the Inside Gate.  It also includes basic blocks and kickboxing, my most important weapon disarms, and the collar-and-elbow clinch as well as other head controls and chokes.  Strike-and-Bail concepts and footwork are also here as well as some  traditional self-defense and escapes.  That is the third circle of Outerclinch.  PIC ONION

That’s it for the Narrow Focus.  The rest is Wide Range which doesn’t get trained as often. 

The next layer includes: more 2-on-1's as well as 1-on-1's and 2-on-2's as well as counters and escapes for these moves, more wrestling and kickboxing as well as some Brazilian jiujistu, basic handfighitng and gripfighting, basic weapon fighting, more blocking and trapping hands.  That is the fourth circle of Outerclinch and the first circle of Wide Range.  PIC ONION

And the circles keep expanding...

 

 

Top 10 2-on-1's

1- Cop's Russian

2- R2D2

3- Bent Russian

4- Cop's Armpit

5- Jacket Pin

6- Leopardfist

7- Baseball Bat

8- Gooseneck

9- I2D2

10- Russian Tie

 

CHART to show circles of the Outerclinch

Core- Cop's Russian

Circle 1- Calm Down Sir, R2D2, Pummel,

Circle 2- Bent Russian, Cop’s Armpit, Jacket Pin, Leopardfist, Baseball Grip and Gooseneck. Wallfightigng

Circle 3- Russian Tie and I2D2, basic blocks and kickboxing, most important weapon disarms, and the collar-and-elbow clinch as well as other head controls and chokes.  Strike-and-Bail concepts and footwork are also here as well as some traditional self-defense and escapes. 

Wide Range- more 2-on-1's as well as 1-on-1's and 2-on-2's as well as counters and escapes for these moves, more wrestling and kickboxing as well as some Brazilian jiujistu, basic handfighitng and gripfighting, basic weapon fighting, more blocking and trapping hands.  

 

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